Bruce Marshall Rare Books

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BRIGGS, HENRY

Trigonometria Britannica: sive de doctrina triangulorum libri duo FIRST EDITION, (edited by Henry Gellibrand). Gouda: Pieter Rammazeyn, 1633 folio (350 x 212mm.), half-title, complete with 272 pp. of tables, contemporary tree calf gilt, rebacked, half-title restored at edge. This important work has the first complete set of Trigonometrical Tables In circa 1577 Briggs entered St. John’s College, Cambridge, where he received a bachelor’s degree in 1581 and a master’s degree in 1585. He was elected a fellow of St. John’s in 1589 and a lecturer in mathematics and medicine there in 1592. While at St. John’s, Briggs began research in astronomy and navigation with the mathematician Edward Wright. In 1596 Briggs was appointed the first professor of Geometry at the newly opened Gresham College in London, and for more than two decades he was instrumental in establishing it as a major centre for scientific research and advanced mathematical instruction. Briggs also took an active part in bridging the gap between mathematical theory and practice. He instructed mariners in navigation, advised explorers on various proposed expeditions, and invested in the London Company (responsible for founding Jamestown, Virginia, in 1607). His publications from this period include A Table to find the Height of the Pole, the Magnetic Declination being given (1602) and Tables for the Improvement of Navigation (1610); he returned to the subject of exploration later with A Treatise of the Northwest Passage to the South Sea, Through the Continent of Virginia and by Fretum Hudson (1622). In 1632, Henry Gellibrand, then the Professor of Astronomy at Gresham College, London, arranged for the publishing of the Trigonometria Britannica (T. B.) by Adrian Vlacq in Gouda the following year: the work consisted of two Books, and sets of tables of natural sines in steps of one hundredth of a degree to 15 places, as well as tables of tangents & secants to 10 places, together with their logarithms. The explanatory Book I was the last work of Henry Briggs (1559-1631), Savilian Professor of Geometry at Oxford, and was devoted mainly to the construction of his table of sines; while Book II, written by the youthful Gellibrand on the instigation of the dying Briggs, his mentor, contained instructions and examples on the use of logarithms in solving trigonometrical problems. Henry Briggs should be remembered in the first place for his ground-breaking work in navigational tables. In fact, he contributed more tables to Wright’s ‘On Certain Errors in Navigation’, which were of an astronomical nature, since he was also an able astronomer.

Sachgebiete: Astronomie, Maschinenbau, Mathematik, Reisen/Reiseliteratur

3000,- EUR

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THE BRITISH MUSEUM [PHOTOGRAPHS BY OR AFTER ROGER FENTON AND STEPHEN THOMPSON]

[50 Photographs of Antiquities, including the Elgin Marbles] British Museum Series A collection of 50 albumen prints, from the British Museum Series, numerous manuscript captions, slight age-related toning, photographs mounted to album, occasional light marginal foxing not affecting image, original maroon cloth with quarter morocco spine, retaining studs, title gilt to spine, slightly rubbed, folio, [London: W.A. Mansell, c.1897] The 50 photographs of antiquities in the British Museum, covering Greek, Roman and Etruscan Statues and Vases, including 24 of the Parthenon Frieze. Many of the images are accompanied by manuscript captions. Other photographs include: Horse of Selene, Ilissos, “Colossal Lion”, [The Piranesi Vase] “Marble Vase (found in the Villa of Hadrian at Tivoli)”, “Mercury”, “Venus de Medici”, “The “Townley” Venus”, “Venus Entering Bath”, “Apollo as a Player of the Lyre, from Cyrene”, “Hercules”, Hercules found in Hadrian's villa at Tivoli, Drum of Sculptured Column from Temple of Diana [Artemision], Ephesus, “Casts from Balustrade of Temple of Wingless Victory - Athens -”, Etruscan Sepulchral Monument in terracotta, “Thalia” T. Aurelius Fulvius Antonius Pius, Aurelius Antoni, Satyr, Apollo, Demeter [Ceres] and Sepulchral Rites at the Tomb of a Hero. The Elgin Marbles are a collection of statues and architectural decoration acquired by the Earl of Elgin during his time as Ambassador to the Ottoman Empire. He successfully petitioned the authorities to be able to measure, draw and remove figures in various ruins. The most extensive work was on the Parthenon or Temple of Athena, but he also received permission to remove sculptural and architectural elements from a number of other ruins including the Acropolis and the Temple of Nike Athena. The most famous of the Elgin Marbles are the Parthenon Sculptures, a collection of different types of marble architectural decoration on the Parthenon. The Parthenon Frieze, 75 metres in length, depicts various scenes including the battle between the Lapitas and the Centaurs at the marriage feast of Peirithoos. Elgin originally intended on using the Frieze as decoration in his private home, but due to the collapse of his marriage he sold them to the British Museum. There have been debates over the legitimacy of Elgin’s excavation. After an investigation from a Parliamentary Select Committee in 1816, Elgin’s actions were found to be entirely legal. Since 1983 Greece has formally requested the British Museum to return all the Parthenon Sculptures in the Museum's collection, the British Museum states there are no current discussions with the Greek Government on this issue. Roger Fenton is one of the most celebrated figures in the history of photography. He was a creative and highly influential photographer in the mediums “golden age” of the 1850s. In his role as the British Museum’s first official photographer, Fenton demonstrated his sure sense as a ‘photo artist’. He was initially engaged to photograph cuneiform tablets, but that soon developed into taking pictures of other antiquities. As early as 1852 Fenton received permission from the Trustees to photograph antiquities within the museum, establishing a small studio inside the museum the following year. He left in 1854 to serve as a photographer in the Crimean War (for which he is most widely known) but he was re-appointed on his return in 1856 until the termination of his contract in July 1859. The Trustees decided that photography was not cost effective and, after they failed to negotiate the South Kensington Museum (now the V&A) as an alternative, Fenton terminated his association with the British Museum. References: The British Museum, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Luminous-Lint.

Sachgebiete: Altertum, Griechenland, Photographie

6000,- EUR

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DE JODE,CORNELIS

Hemispheriu ab Aequinoctiali Linea, ad Circulu Poli Arctici. Hemispheriu ab Aequinoctiali Linea, ad Circulu Poli Atarctici One of the Finest Sixteenth Century World Maps. Fine dark impression of Cornelis De Jode's double hemisphere map of the world on a polar projection, First Edition, Antwerp 1593, [520 x 320mm] De Jode's map is one of only a few 16th Century maps of the world drawn on a twin polar hemisphere projection. Richly annotated with contemporary geographical knowledge (accurate and myth), much of the geography is largely based on the Italian maps of the Lafreri School. It is thought that De Jode acquired these source maps from agents of Venetian and Roman mapmakers at one of the annual gatherings of the Frankfurt Book Fair. While De Jode’s Lafreri sources were groundbreaking, as (in sum) the first maps to, in detail, show all of the world as it was then conceived by Europeans, the present map naturally shows both the amazing breadth and limitations of contemporary knowledge. While the Lafreri mapmakers were able to gain access to a number of, often ‘pirated’, original source maps, the policies of ‘cartographic secrecy’ employed by the Portuguese and Spanish governments, the prime movers of exploration during the 16th-century, placed a limitation on available sources. That factor, and the reality that much of the world had not yet been explored by Europeans, let alone charted, was responsible for enduring cartographic misconceptions. It is worth noting that the fascinating twin polar hemisphere projection had the effect of excessively attenuating the landforms located near the Equator, or near the margins of the hemispheres. As seen on the left, or Northern Hemisphere, North America and Asia are separated by the mythical Strait of Anian, placing Japan very close to the Northwest Coast of America. The coastal details in East Asia are derived from Lafreri maps, pre-dating the information disseminated in the works of Rughesi and Plancius. The coast of China does not bulge outwards, as it does in reality, but here sweeps diagonally upward, with no sign of Korea (either island or peninsula). The Philippines are also not yet shown in any coherent fashion, as the mapping is still based on Pigafetta’s rudimentary reports. While the Malay Peninsula is easily identifiable, and notes the Portuguese trading base of Malacca (secured in 1511), Sumatra is incorrectly identified as “Taprobana”, the archaic name for Sri Lanka. The Indian Subcontinent takes on an unfamiliar, bulbous form, although Sri Lanka correctly appears off of its southeastern tip. The delineation of the coasts of the Arabian Peninsula and Africa are quite fine for the time, emanating from Portuguese sources. In the Americas, California is named, and the mythical cities of Quivira and Civola are also labeled. The mapping of Eastern Canada and the American Atlantic Seaboard is quite rudimentary. Newfoundland is shown, although Labrador is depicted as an island. The St. Lawrence River is shown to be of an exaggerated breadth, although ‘Stadcona’ (Quebec City) and ‘Hochelaga’ (Montreal), are noted, as well as Algonquin towns discovered by Jacques Cartier, from 1534 to 1541. Further south towards Florida, the coasts are bereft of accurate detail, as the map predates John Smith’s mapping of Chesapeake Bay and New England. Turning to the Southern Hemisphere (to the right), a massive ‘Terra Australis Incognita’ dominates the projection. The Straits of Magellan separate this apocryphal continent from South America, a misconception that would remain in place until Le Maire rounded Cape Horn in 1615. South America is shown on a very wide projection, retaining the bulge made famous in the first edition of Ortelius' map of America. In the eastern seas, Terra Australis is shown to extend upwards into the eastern reaches of the Indonesian Archipelago. De Jode's map is one of the great icons of map collecting. The map is based upon the now lost first edition of Guillaume Postel's wall map of the World (1581), and a unique set of Globe Gores measuring 2.4 meters x 1.2 meters from circa 1587, known in 1 copy (Bibliotheque Nationale de France), attributed by Marcel Destombes to engravers Antoine Wierix and Adrian Collard, who likely made the map for Cornelis De Jode (referred to by Destombes as the Antwerp Unicum). As noted by Rodney Shirley: The map is an interesting adaptation of Guillaume Postel's 1581 world map with some curious features reminiscent of the large anonymous gores probably published in Antwerp in about 1587. In both maps we have the same configuration for the northern coasts - the Gulf of Merosro in North America, the placing of Ter. d Labrador and Nova Zembla, and the odd junction of the eastern part of Asia with one of the large arctic masses. Japan is to be found only a few degrees from the west coast of America, and in the delineation of South Africa and South America there are further features strongly suggesting a common source. Shirley 184; Skelton, 'De Jode Speculum Orbis Terrarum' (Introduction) pp.

Sachgebiete: Geographie, Kartographie, Landkarten, Reisen/Reiseliteratur

38000,- EUR

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HABRECHT, ISAAC II.

Planiglobium coeleste, et terrestre, sive, globus coelestis, atque terrestris nova forma ac norma in planum projectus, omnes globorum circulos, gradus, partes, stellas, sidera, loca, in planis tabulis aeri incisis artificiose exhibens... Strasbourg, Mark von Heyden, 1628 [with:] Planiglobium terrestre. Strasbourg, Mark von Heyden, 1629 2 parts in one vol, 4to (195 x 150 mm), pp [x] 102; [103-] 206, with engraved title to second part and woodcut diagrams in text, as usual without the two folding planispheres but present in the atlas vol below; some browning, otherwise an attractive copy bound in a contemporary manuscript leaf with decorated and coloured initials. [with:] HABRECHT, ISAAC II and JOHANN CHRISTOPH STURM Planiglobium coeleste, et terrestre…. Nuremberg, Fürst, 1666 Folio (415 x 305 mm), with 14 engraved plates, bound in a uniform manuscript leaf. First edition of Habrecht’s treatise on the construction of celestial and terrestrial globes and planispheres, accompanied by his pupil Sturm’s atlas intended to illustrate same. Isaac Habrecht II (1589-1633) was doctor of medicine and professor of mathematics and astronomy at the University of Strasbourg. He was one of a famous family, Swiss in origin, of clock and astronomical instrument makers in Strasbourg; his father, Isaac I, constructed the famous Strasbourg cathedral astronomical clock designed by Conrad Dasypodius and completed in 1574. Isaac II designed a famous celestial globe in 1625, which so impressed Jacob Bartsch, Kepler’s son-in-law and coiner of the term ‘planisphere’, that he modelled his own work upon it. This work was accompanied by two planispheres that are rarely present. Of the several copies in Continental libraries, all but one lack the plates. They are, however, present in the Sturm atlas; one is in fact dated 1628. J. C. Sturm (1635-1703) was Habrecht’s student. He organized the first scientific academy in Germany, the ‘Collegium Curiosum sive Experimentale’ at Altdorf in 1672, and introduced the first course in experimental physics in a German university. In 1662, he undertook the task of augmenting Habrecht’s original text and adding a number of folding plates. The plates include the two celestial planispheres from the original work, being polar stereographic celestial charts of the northern and southern constellations, printed from the same plates, two handsome polar projections of the world, and ten folded engravings showing the various parts of his ‘planiglobiums’. The plates, superbly executed by Jacob von der Heyden, were probably intended to be mounted and assembled to form several instruments, each with a revolving plate measuring 27 cm in diameter and a movable pointer. Each was to be supported on an approximately 12 cm base. The work is one of the most beautiful instrument books published in the seventeenth century and certainly one of the rarest, particularly with the full complement of plates. Regarding the two planispheres, Warner writes: ‘Habrecht derived the bulk of the information for this globe from Plancius. The origin of Rhombus – a constellation near the south pole that as reticulum survives today – is unclear. It may perhaps derive from the quadrilateral arrangement of stars seen by Vespucci around the Antarctic pole. In any case, Rhombus as such seems to have made its first appearance on Habrecht’s globe’ (The sky explored p 104). Houzeau and Lancaster 3039; Zinner 5089; Warner, The Sky Explored, pp 104-5 and 2c; OCLC records no copies of the 1628-9 text in North America, and Chicago and Brown for the atlas

Sachgebiete: Astronomie, Atlanten, Globen, Instrumente (Technik), Kartographie

15000,- EUR

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HEYLYN, PETER

Cosmography, in Four Books. Containing the Chorography and History of the Whole World, and all the Principal Kingdoms, Provinces, Seas, and Isles thereof..., Revised,Corrected, and Enlarged by the Author himself immediately before his Death, London: Philip Chetwind, 1670, Folio, Contemporary Mottled Calf, Rebacked with original Calf spine, morocco labels gilt, a very Attractive Crisp Copy. With the additional engraved title stating 6th edition and imprint dated 1670, letterpress title in red & black with signature at head, (includes letterpress general title of 3rd edition, 1665), Folding engraved World Map and four folding engraved maps of the Continents: America; Asia; Africa and Europe each with imprint dated 1666. This seems to be the only edition that includes a map of the world as well as the 4 continents. Heylyn’s"Cosmographie", is an attempt to describe in meticulous detail every aspect of the known world in 1652. The geography, climate, customs, achievements, politics, and belief systems. It is the first work to describe in print Australia, and California, Terra del Fuego, and other territories in the New World and includes descriptions of the Arctic, Antarctica and the fabled North West Passage. The text describes exploration by Martin Frobisher, Drake and other early explorers. He objected to the name "America" as it placed undue glory on Amerigo Vespucci, and recommended "Columbana" or "Cabotia" as more indicative of the true discoverers, Columbus and Cabot. Peter Heylyn (1599 –1662) was an English ecclesiastic and author of many polemical, historical, political and theological tracts. He incorporated his political concepts into his geographical books, Microcosmus in 1621 and the most important, Cosmographie (1657). Heylyn was born in Burford, Oxfordshire, the son of Henry Heylyn and Elizabeth Clampard. He entered Merchant Taylor's School in March 1612. At 14 he was sent to Hart Hall, Oxford and, matriculated from Magdalen College, Oxford on 19 January 1616, aged 15. He was awarded BA on 17 October 1617 and was elected a fellow in 1618.He lectured on historical geography at Magdalen.Heylyn was awarded MA on 1 July 1620. He presented his lecture to Prince Charles, at Theobalds. He was incorporated at Cambridge University in 1621 and his lectures were published as Microcosmos: A Little Description of the Great World. In 1633 he was licenced to preach and was awarded D.D. on 13 April,1633. He became a chaplain to Charles I and 1639 he became rector South Warnborough, Hampshire. He suffered for his loyalty to the king when, under the Commonwealth, he was deprived of his preferments. He subsequently settled at Abingdon, Berkshire (now Oxfordshire) and at the Restoration, he was made sub-Dean of Westminster, but poor health prevented further advancement.He married Letitia Highgate and had a large family. His monument is in Westminster Abbey. He was a prolific writer, and a keen and acrimonious controversialist against the Puritans. Among his works are a History of the Reformation, and a Life of Archbishop William Laud (Cyprianus Anglicanus) (1668). His Greek titles included Κειμηλιαέκκληδιαδτικα (Historical and miscellaneous tracts a 1662 (1681) and Ἡρωολογια Anglorum; or, a help to English history 1641.

Sachgebiete: Atlanten, Geographie, Kartographie, Landkarten, Reisen/Reiseliteratur

3500,- EUR

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LINSCHOTEN, JAN HUYGEN VAN

Itinerarium, Ofte Schipvaert naer Oost ofte Portugaels Indien. Inhoudende een beschrijvinghe dier Landen, Zee-custen, havens, Rivieren, Hoecken ende plaetsen, met de ghedenckwaerdighste Historien der selve. Hier zijn by gevoeght de Conterfeytsels, van de habijten, drachten, so van Portugesen aldaer residerende, als van de Ingeboorene Indianen: Ende van hare Tempelen, Afgoden, Huysingen, manieren, Godes-dienst, Politie, Huys-Houdingen ende Coophandel, hoe ende waer die ghedreven wordt: Als oock van de Boomen, Vruchten, Cruyden, Speceryen, ende dierghelijcke Materialen van die Landen. Amsterdam, Jan Evertsz Cloppenburch, 1614, Folio, Contemporary Vellum, Yapp edges, 3 parts in one volume, (8),160; (8),13-147, (1); (82),(2),(8 index)p., 3 engraved titles , one title-page with engraved vignette of a ship surrounded by 4 views of Antwerp, Amsterdam, Middelburg and Enkhuizen, Portrait of the author, with 6 folding engraved maps by J. van Doetecum after P. Plancius (worldmap) and by A.F. and H.F. Langren, and 36 double-page and folding plans, plates and views by J. and B. van Doeticum after Linschoten, Contemporary Vellum, Yapp Edges. Linschoten’s highly important work, opening the East and the New World for trade by the Dutch and the English. Until its publication no other book contained any comparable amount of useful information on the East and West Indies and it soon became required reading for all navigators sailing to the East or the Americas. The maps and engravings include a fine World Map after Plancius. This edition includes chapters on the coast of “Arabia Felix” (that is, the southern coast of the Arabian peninsula), the island of Ormus and Islamic India. Included is a detailed map depicting Arabia, Persia and India by Langren. The interior has been taken from Gastaldi after Mercator’s World Map of 1569, but has been given interesting improvements: “The surprising fact about the representation of the [Arabian] peninsula is the close resemblance of the outline to that of a modern map when compared with other engraved maps of the time. There is a vague suggestion of the Qatar peninsula, which is not seen again until the nineteenth century” (Tibbets). The book is divided into four parts. The first treats the East Indies, including eastern Africa and Arabia and extending to regions as far east as Japan. The second book describes the navigation of the coasts of West Africa around the Cape of Good Hope to Arabia, together with the coasts of the New World. Book three, based on the discoveries of the Portuguese Royal pilot Diego Affonso, contains sailing directions from Portugal to India, and instructions for sailing in the East Indies, from island to island. Similar instructions are given for the New World, particularly Brazil and Spanish America. Book four contains detailed information on the taxes and other income that the King of Spain extracted from his territories, both at home and overseas. Muller, America 2185-2187; Sabin 41356; World Map: Shirley 187.

Sachgebiete: Amerika, Asien, Atlanten, Kartographie, Reisen/Reiseliteratur

55000,- EUR

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LODEWIJCKSZ, Willem

Prima pars descriptionis itineris navalis in Indiam Orientalem Amsterdam,: Cornelis Nicolaus, 1598. Tall quarto, with a total of 49 inset engravings (including 7 maps), 12 pages featuring woodcut coastal profiles, also bound with the scarce plate depicting a bazaar; generally in really good condition, bound in contemporary red calf, rebacked, First Latin edition of the first published account of the first Dutch trading fleet to the East Indies. This account was written by Lodewijcksz, who sailed under Cornelius de Houtman and Pieter Dirckz on their pioneering trading voyage to South-east Asia in 1595-7, an expedition which saw them trade at the great pepper port of Bantam, quite close to where Batavia was later founded, as well as providing first-hand information about the north coast of Java, Sunda Strait, and Bali.This strategic push ultimately meant that the theories about a Great Southern Land would be tested against the reality of the Australian coast, so it is fitting that the world map on the title-page still carries the last vestiges of Marco Polo, the coastline marked "Beach", "Lucach", and "Maletur". 'Lodewijcksz depicts the island of Bali in recognizable form for the first time, both on the general map and on a separate map of the island in his book.' The crew was so delighted with the island that they wanted to call it "New Holland" (Su·rez, Early Mapping of Southeast Asia, p. 183). The trading fleet of de Houtman and Dirckz comprised four ships, three of which returned to the Netherlands in 1597. Although not a great financial success, this venture confirmed the waning influence of the Portuguese, directly leading to the seventeenth-century Dutch incursions into the region: as Howgego notes, in 1598, the same year this work was published, no fewer than 25 ships were sent out to the Indies, and the Dutch East India Company was established in 1602. It was in 1605 that Willem Jansz and another Lodewijcksz, Jan Lodewycksz van Roosengin, sailed on the Duyfken to Cape York.The most significant geographical achievement of Houtman's voyage was that by sailing round Java it proved that this island could not be part of the supposed southland (see Schilder, Australia Unveiled, ch. VI). The map on the title-page shows the oceans and coasts navigated between Europe and the East Indies, including the promontory of a southern continent, with the names 'Beach', 'Lucach', 'Maletur', in close proximity to an island, 'Java Minor'.'Like the English, Houtman's men suffered so severely from scurvy that they had to put in at the Cape of Good Hope and at Antongil Bay in Madagascar to recuperate. They then sailed straight across the Indian Ocean to the Straits of Sunda and dropped anchor at Bantam in Java without the loss of a ship. At this port, the center of the Javanese pepper trade, a long time was spent. Both natives and Portuguese showed considerable hostility, and Houtman and some of his men were imprisoned. However, the Dutch succeeded in making a commercial treaty and departed with a good cargo. They proceeded eastward to Bali, and then returned along the south coast of Java, thereby acquiring a more correct impression of the width of the island than had prevailed and laid the ghost of Java's being the northern part of the Southern Continent... the Dutch skipper had enough to show for his venture to inspire the merchants of Amsterdam with a determination to exploit the trade...' (Penrose, Travel and Discovery in the Renaissance).

Sachgebiete: Amerika, Asien, Australien/Südsee , Niederlande , Reisen/Reiseliteratur

18000,- EUR

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MERIAN, MATTHAEUS

Todten-Tantz, wie derselbe in der löblichen und weit-berühmten Stadt Basel, als ein Spiegel menschlicher Beschaffenheit… Frankfurt, Joh. B. Andrea and H. Hort, 1725, 4to, Contemporary mottled calf gilt, hinges repaired, title within hand-coloured engraved allegorical border, with 42 full-page contemporary hand-coloured engraved illustrations of the Dance of Death, all but 2 with additional watercolour and wash architectural or decorative borders, one uncoloured engraved illustration ("Memento Mori"). An Extraordinary Coloured Copy of the famous ‘Dance of Death’. The Dance of Death series displays a very quick and lively skeleton leading someone away in a dance step. The partner's social station is instantly recognizable, but death is indifferent to rank: the death figure is just as cheerful leading off the Queen or the Pope as the Merchant or the Beggar. While the conventions may have originated in Medieval Pageants, their popularity grew and flourished in the Renaissance and Baroque periods. Basel in Switzerland hosted a thriving printing industry, and the Dance of Death series painted in fresco in the 15th century on the walls of the Predigerkirche influenced several printed editions, notably Holbein's. Yet the copies produced by the printer and engraver Matthaeus Merian are considered the most faithful renderings of the Basel frescoes. The frescoes were destroyed (deemed "an eyesore" by the town council) in 1805.Merian made his drawings from the Basel frescoes in 1616, and published minimal versions of them in 1621 and 1625. Merian augmented each image in the 1649 suite with sky, clouds and background detail. This edition of 1725 is particularly attractive, richly engraved and printed on heavy paper. Merian's Adam and Eve plate, and his famously surreal death's-head self-portrait plate appear here. This book was frequently reprinted and copied for the succeeding 150 years, becoming the most instantly recognizable of all Baroque editions of the Dance of Death.

Sachgebiete: Handschriften, Illustrierte Bücher, Niederlande , Occulta

12000,- EUR

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APIANUS, PETRUS

Instrument Buch durch Petrum Apianum erst von new beschriben. Zum ersten ist darinne begriffen ein newer Quadrant, dardurch Tag und Nacht, bey der Sonnen, Mon, vnnd andern Planeten, auch durch ettliche Ge – stirn, die Stunden, und ander nutzung, gefunden wer - den. Zum Andern, wie man die höch der Thurn, und anderer gebew, des gleichen die weyt, brayt, und tieffe, durch die Spigel und Instrument, messen soll. Zum Dritten, wie man das wasser absehen oder abwe - gen soll/ ob man das in ein Schloss oder Statt füeren möge, und wie man die Brünne suchen soll. Zum Vierden, sindt drey Instrument, die mögen in der gantzen welt bey Tag und bey Nacht gebraucht wer - den: vnnd haben gar vil und manicherlay breüche, und all geschlecht der Stunden, behalten alle zu gleich ire Lateinischen nämen. Zum Fünfften, wie man künstlich durch Finger der Hän - de die Stund in der Nacht, on alle Instrument erkhen - nen soll. Zum Letzten, ist darin ein newer Messstab, des glei - chen man nenndt den Jacobs stab, dardurch auch die höch, brayt,weyt, und dieffe, auff newe art gefunden wirt. Ingolstadii [Inglstadt] Cum Gratia & Privilegio Caesareo ad Triginta Annos. 1533. FIRST EDITION, folio (280 x 190mm.), title printed in red and black with large woodcut showing astronomers, some text leaves folding, 9 woodcut plates (some folding), illustrated with woodcuts throughout, early calf mottled gilt This copy has three leaves bound at end from Apianus' Folium Populi, printed in 1533. This illustrated work shows the use of over forty different mathematical instruments. It is one of the earliest technical books to use a language other than Latin. Apianus chose German, because his work was intended for practitioners in the field, rather than scholars. "Indeed, in the introduction to the work, Apian calls upon other authors to publish in German so as to encourage the broader dissemination of technical information. This copy contains uncut volvelles, printed on one side of the page, with each part (body of the instrument, major rotating scales, sighting vanes, etc.) separated. Apian intended that readers would cut out the individual items and assemble the instruments" (Tomash & Williams). The instrument book of Peter Apian of 1533 gives a survey of the amazing variety of instruments. Three instruments are discussed which are important as basic types: Diopter disk, Quadratum Geometricum and the Jacob’s staff. The attractive engraved title shows several different types of mathematical instruments.On the right an astronomer is using a 'nocturnal' to determine the time at night. The two in the middle are using different types of quadrant to tell the time from the angle of the sun above the horizon. The astronomer in the middle in the background is using a simple instrument called a 'Jacob's staff' to measure the width of a building, from the angle between its corners (using the principle of similar triangles). Finally, the person on the left is measuring the angle between two stars using the oldest mathematical instrument ever invented: the fingers on our own hands! The mathematical theme of the picture is emphasised by two huge imaginary mathematical shapes in the front. One is made out of sides with pentagons and is called a regular Dodecahedron. The other has sides made out of equilateral triangles and is called a regular Icosahedron. Crone Library 18; USTC 669173; VD16 A3111; cf. VD16 ZV 659 and USTC 669172

Sachgebiete: Astronomie, Instrumente (Technik), Kartographie, Reisen/Reiseliteratur

12000,- EUR

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RUMPHIUS, GEORG EBERHARD

D’Amboinsche Rariteitkamer, Behelzende eene Beschryvinge van allerhande zoo weeke als harde Schaalvisschen, te weeten rare Krabben, Kreeften,en diergelyke Zeerdieren,als mede allerhande Hoorntjes en Schulpen, die men in d’Amboinsche Zee vindt: daar beneven zommige Minaraalan, Gesteenten,en soorten van Aarde, die D’Amboinsche, en zommige omleggende Eilanden gevonden worden. Amsterdam, Fr.Halma 1705. FIRST EDITION, Folio, Contemporary Panelled Calf, hinges repaired, [28], 340, [43] S., with engraved Frontispiece, Portrait, numerous woodcuts and 60 finely engraved plates, many after drawings by Maria Sibylla Merian, all with fine early hand-colouring.A SUPERB EARLY HAND-COLOURED COPY OF THE FIRST EDITION The very rare first edition with a much finer and more delicate engraving than the later editions of this classic on the marine life of the area of the Molucca Islands in the Indonesian Archipelago in splendid hand-colouring. Rumphius was employed by the Dutch East India Company and spent the greater part of his life on the island of Ambon, a small but important trading centre in the Dutch East Indies. He began a systematic study of the flora and fauna of this island, describing and drawing all he saw and sending his manuscripts to Amsterdam. Though far away from centres of western civilisation , Rumphius was not literary isolated. He corresponded with many scholars in the Indies and Europe such as Ten Rhijne, Camphuys, Cleyer, Mentzel, Valentini, etc.and in 1681 he became a member of the Academia Naturae Curiosorum with the honourable name of “Plinius Indicus”. This, his most famous work was published in 1705 after his death and was especially interesting and useful for the owners of popular collections of natural curiosities. Recent research has shown that most of the plates were engraved after drawings by Maria Sibylla Merian and although the plates of shells are particularly beautiful the engravings of crustacea are among the most striking ever produced. Nissen,ZBI 3518;Wood 545

Sachgebiete: Asien, Australien/Südsee , Illustrierte Bücher, Naturwissenschaften, Zoologie

15000,- EUR

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DAMPIER, WILLIAM

Nouveau Voyage Autour Du Monde Ou L'on Decrit En Particulier L'Istme De L'Amerique, Plusiers Cotes & Isles Des Indes Occidentales, Les Isles Du Cap Verd, Le Passage Par La Terre Del Fuego, Les Cotes Meridionales De Chili, Du Perou, & Du Mexique. Rouen, Jean Baptiste Machuel, 1723, 5 volumes, 12mo, Contemporary Calf Gilt, elaborately gilt spines, morocco labels, with 3 engraved frontispieces, 62 engraved plates and 15 maps, mostly folding, a very attractive set. Second printing of the French translation of William Dampier's famous work ' A New Voyage Round the World', 1697. ‘William Dampier combined a swashbuckling life of adventure with pioneering scientific achievements. In 1676, he started his career as a buccaneer preying on ships on the Spanish Main and struggling through the impenetrable jungle of the Isthmus of Panama in search of gold. He could easily have ended up on the gallows. Poor and obscure yet determined to sail the world to make his fortune, he was to become the first person to circumnavigate the globe three times. Among his many extraordinary achievements, Dampier mapped the winds and the currents of the world’s oceans for the first time. He inspired Darwin one hundred and fifty years later with his notes on the wildlife of the Galapagos islands and elsewhere. His portrait in London’s National Portrait Gallery shows a lean, strong-featured man with a thoughtful expression, brown shoulder-length hair and a plain coat, holding a book in his hand. He is styled ‘Pirate and Hydrographer’ but even that tells only part of his story. He was a pioneering navigator, naturalist , travel writer and explorer, as well as hydrographer who was, indeed, quite happy to seek his fortune as a pirate.’ Preston.

Sachgebiete: Amerika, Australien/Südsee , Geographie, Reisen/Reiseliteratur

3800,- EUR

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Maritime Charts. British Admiralty.

A Collection of Maritime Coastal Charts of Indian Ocean, Including Madagascar. A Collection of 23 Maritime Charts of Indian Ocean, including Madagascar, The Seychelles and the Malacca Strait, copper engraved, mostly double-page, many with coastal profiles, vignettes, inset charts, former working maps, cancelled stamp from the Admiralty on some charts, some wear and position markings, London, published by the Admiralty, [1822- 1935] Updated c.1930s These surveys are by some prominent officers and hydrographers. Some ships that took part in the surveying include H.M.S. Leven, H.M.S. Barracouta, H.M.S. Alert, H.M.S. Waterwitch, H.M.S. Magpie and H.M.S. Clio Comprising of: Sokotra, 1835; Sokotra, 1835; The Seychelles Group with the Amirante and Other Outlying Islands, 1882; Cape St. Andrew to Antongil Bay, 1822-6; Penang Harbour, 1884; Achin Head to Diamond Head, 1872-74; Cape St. Andrew to Bevato I, 1873; Delagoa Bay to Cape Guardafui including Mozambique Channel and Madagascar I…, 1881; Pulo Berhala to Cape Rachado, 1895; Klang Strait and Approaches, 1908; North Approach to Klang Strait, 1909; Indian Ocean, Northern Portion, 1912; Butang Group to Pulo Berhala, 1913; Diamond Point to Pulo Berhala, 1913; Indian Ocean - Northern Portion, 1923; Pulo Berhala to Cape Rachado, 1923; North West Part of Sumatra and the Off-Lying Islands, 1928; Ujong Porola to Ujong Raja, 1929; Malacca Strait with Part of the East Coast of the Malay Penninsula, 1929; Penang Harbour, 1930; Cape Rachado to Singapore, 1932; Indian Ocean - Northern Portion, 1937. These Admiralty charts or hydrographic charts were produced by the British Admiralty. The Hydrographic Office was established as a sub-department of the Admiralty in 1795 and issued its first officially published Admiralty chart in November 1800. Most Admiralty charts delineate the coastline and high and low water marks, and record the depth of water as established from soundings. They record navigational hazards such as reefs and wrecks, and navigational aids, such as lights, buoys and beacons. Most charts have a compass indicator, often an elaborate compass rose. They also have some indication of scale, either a scale bar or representative fraction, or a border showing degrees of latitude and longitude. One of the characteristics of an Admiralty chart is that it is continually updated and corrected. Obsolete charts were regarded as dangerous and were to be destroyed because they presented a potential navigational hazard. Dates of survey and compilation are minutely recorded, as are those of the corrections continually made to maintain the accuracy and utility of the chart. These corrections were often made by amending the existing copper plates on which the chart was engraved and re-publishing it as a new edition; in other instances, the chart was completely re-drawn. However, in the early years of the Hydrographic Office, published Admiralty charts were drawn on earlier surveys. In extreme cases this means that some charts may be based on surveys made more than a century earlier. For example, Admiralty chart 751, the chart of Maculla Bay which was listed in the first published catalogue of 1825, bears a survey date of 1703. They are also numbered in manuscript to record when they were updated. Some Admiralty charts contain little information on areas inland of the foreshore other than that required to assist in making a landfall. Others include extensive representations of land features and may also have coastal elevations and topographic views as insets. Nineteenth-century charts in particular may include ground plans of sites of archaeological interest, or details of coastal forts and other defences, as well as pictures of natural features. Some insets contain detailed charts of harbours. Admiralty charts record names given to coastal features and include many names no longer in use today. In many instances they also provide the best and most easily accessible maps of small oceanic islands. Some charts record surveys of navigable rivers. This collection of charts records the date of the survey, the captain, officer and in many cases the ship or ships that took part.

Sachgebiete: Afrika, Indien , Kartographie, Landkarten, Reisen/Reiseliteratur

2000,- EUR

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Maritime Charts. British Admiralty.

A Collection of Maritime Coastal Charts of Africa. A Collection of 19 Maritime Charts of Africa, copper engraved, mostly double-page, many with coastal profiles, vignettes, inset charts, former working maps, cancelled stamp from the Admiralty on some charts, some wear and position markings, London, published by the Admiralty, [1838- 1935] Updated c.1930s These surveys are by some prominent officers and hydrographers. Three of the surveys and charts are by Lieut-Commander A.F.B. Woodhouse of the H.M.S. Protea. Some ships that took part in the surveying include H.M.S. Rambler, H.M.S. Sylvia, H.M.S. Petrel, H.M.S. Barracouta and H.M.S. Mutine Comprising of: Ras Korai to Ras Hafun, 1838; Ras Kalwein to Ras Hantara, 1838; Waterloo Bay to banshee River, 1865; Cape of Good Hope and Adjacent Coasts from Hondeklip Bay to Durban with the Agulhas Bank, 1867; Cape Agulhas to Mossel Bay, 1867; Delagoa Bay to River Zambezi, 1884; Cape Lopez to Cape of Good Hope, 1887; Simons Bay, 1900; Table Bay, 1910; Durban to Tugela River, 1911-13; Port St. Johns to Port Sheptone, 1925-7; Port Shepstone to Durban, 1925-7; Gnabbaka River to Port St. Jones,1927; Durban, 1929; Tangrier Bay, 1931; Table Bay to Cape Agulahs,1932-3; Tugela River to Delagoa Bay, 1934; River Gambia to Cape Lopez and Annobon including the Bight of Biafra, 1935. These Admiralty charts or hydrographic charts were produced by the British Admiralty. The Hydrographic Office was established as a sub-department of the Admiralty in 1795 and issued its first officially published Admiralty chart in November 1800. Most Admiralty charts delineate the coastline and high and low water marks, and record the depth of water as established from soundings. They record navigational hazards such as reefs and wrecks, and navigational aids, such as lights, buoys and beacons. Most charts have a compass indicator, often an elaborate compass rose. They also have some indication of scale, either a scale bar or representative fraction, or a border showing degrees of latitude and longitude. One of the characteristics of an Admiralty chart is that it is continually updated and corrected. Obsolete charts were regarded as dangerous and were to be destroyed because they presented a potential navigational hazard. Dates of survey and compilation are minutely recorded, as are those of the corrections continually made to maintain the accuracy and utility of the chart. These corrections were often made by amending the existing copper plates on which the chart was engraved and re-publishing it as a new edition; in other instances, the chart was completely re-drawn. However, in the early years of the Hydrographic Office, published Admiralty charts were drawn on earlier surveys. In extreme cases this means that some charts may be based on surveys made more than a century earlier. For example, Admiralty chart 751, the chart of Maculla Bay which was listed in the first published catalogue of 1825, bears a survey date of 1703. They are also numbered in manuscript to record when they were updated. Some Admiralty charts contain little information on areas inland of the foreshore other than that required to assist in making a landfall. Others include extensive representations of land features and may also have coastal elevations and topographic views as insets. Nineteenth-century charts in particular may include ground plans of sites of archaeological interest, or details of coastal forts and other defences, as well as pictures of natural features. Some insets contain detailed charts of harbours. Admiralty charts record names given to coastal features and include many names no longer in use today. In many instances they also provide the best and most easily accessible maps of small oceanic islands. Some charts record surveys of navigable rivers. This collection of charts records the date of the survey, the captain, officer and in many cases the ship or ships that took part.

Sachgebiete: Afrika, Kartographie, Landkarten, Militaria, Reisen/Reiseliteratur

1800,- EUR

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MEULEN, ADAM FRANS VAN DER

Collection of Hunting, Genre and Battle Scenes. Paris [c. 1685] , Large Folio (580 x 470mm), Contemporary Olive Straight-Grained Morocco, with 27 Fine Double-Page, Many Double-Page and Folding, Copper-Engraved Views. A Fine Collection. Van der Meulen was trained by the Belgian court painter Peter Snyders of Brussels. His first work as an independent artist was done in Brussels. He painted genre and history pieces. He joined the painters’ guild in his native city, Brussels, in 1651. Focussing his art on representing horses and landscapes, his fame crossed borders and in 1662 was called to Paris by Jean Baptiste Colbert at the instance of Charles Le Brun, to fill the post of battle painter to Louis IV of France.His paintings during the campaigns of Flanders in 1667 so delighted Louis that from that date van der Meulen was ordered to accompany him in all his expeditions. In 1673 he was received into the Academie Royale de Peintere et de sculpture, attained the grade of councillor in 1681, and died full of honours in Paris in 1690. According to Houbraken, he was famous for his battle scenes (Conquêtes), before being invited to France. After his first wife died, Le Brun's cousin fell in love with him and he dared not refuse her, but her expensive tastes ruined him. It is doubtful today how much of this story is true, since Houbraken mentions also that he earned quite a nice living from his royal protector, and all of his expenses were paid for when he was "campaigning". He was buried in the St. Hippolyte church in Gobelins. Adam Frans van der Meulen ran a flourishing workshop that assisted him in completing private commissions for patrons that did not belong to the court of Louis XIV. He also designed tapestries for the Gobelins factory that depicted accurate historical details of the battles, created paintings of hunting parties and landscapes. The Plates are: 1.Château de Vincennes vu du côté du Parc ; 2. Château de Versailles comme il était cy-devant ; 3. Château de Versailles du côté de l’Orangerie ; 4.Château de Fontainebleau du côté du jardin (triple plate folded in 4) ; 5. La Reine allant à Fontainebleau accompagnée de ses gardes: 6. Vue de la ville de Béthune en Artois (triple plate folded in 4); 7. Vue de la ville d’Ardres du côté de la terre ; 8. vue de la ville et du port de Calais du côté de la terre (triple plate folded in 4); 9. Entrée du Roi dans Dunkerque (triple plate folded in 4); 10. Arrivée du Roi au camp devant Maastricht (triple plate folded in 3); 11. Saint Omer vu du côté du fort de Bournonville ; 12. Arrivée du Prince d’Orange, défaite devant Mont-Cassel ; 13. Vue de Leuve dans le Brabant ; 14. Vue de la ville de Besançon du côté de la Dôle (triple plate folded in 4); 15. Dôle prise dans la première conquête (triple plate folded in 4); 16. Vue de la ville de Gray en Franche Comté ; 17. Vue de Saint Laurent de la Roche et du bourg en Franche Comté ; 18. Vue de Saint Laurent de la Roche du côté du bourg ; 19. Vue du château Ste Anne en Franche Comté ; 20. Vue du château Ste Anne comme il se voit par derrière la montagne ; 21. Vue de la ville et du château de Dinant sur la Meuse; 22. Vue du Luxembourg du côté des bains de Mansfeld ; 23. Le Roy à la chasse au cerf avec les Dames (peint à la demande du souverain) ; 24. Une scène de route non localisée ; 25/ Une scène de bataille non localisée (sans doute la bataille de Rocroi eu égard à la dédicace au Prince de Condé) ;26. Une vue d’un bassin non localisée ; 27. Une scène cynégétique (hunting scene).

Sachgebiete: Altmeistergraphik, Illustrierte Bücher, Reisen/Reiseliteratur, Zeichnungen

12500,- EUR

Bruce Marshall Rare Books

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